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Joining Trinity Chambers in Newcastle

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I am delighted to announce that I have joined Trinity Chambers in Newcastle. I’m joining the Business and Property Group and continuing with my work in relation to professional negligence, commercial disputes and property, along with my interest in financial services cases. My new profile can be found at https://www.trinitychambers.co.uk/people/barristers/chris-hegarty/ I am still available across […]

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Mason v Godiva – a mis-sold mortgage?

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(full case at http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/QB/2018/3227.html) Mr & Mrs Mason were misled by Martyn Balm into a disastrous mortgage. In 2008, they were sold on the idea of investing in property having sold up their family business and borrowed to obtain capital to start up this venture. Having obtained some funding and been advised (by Mr Balm […]

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Bringing the gig economy to an ancient profession

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Today everyone wants jobs done swiftly and at a fixed up front fee. Ideally by the best person for the job. Finding lawyers online isn’t exactly difficult. Finding one that can do what you need isn’t much harder but getting the job you want and no more done for a fixed fee seems somewhat elusive. […]

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No special treatment

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The Supreme Court has answered a recurring question in court procedure – do parties without lawyers get any special treatment? Today’s decision in Barton v Wright Hassall LLP [2018] UKSC 12 is a clear statement that special allowances are not afforded to litigants in person. This follows the trend in cases exemplified by a high […]

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Judicial Review protocol works! 

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Delighted to say that certain public bodies are able to take a balanced view of their decisions when challenged. I successfully presented a clear case of a decision having been made which was incorrect against the legal background but seemed reasonable on the face of the decision.  This is not a common occurrence in my […]

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Supreme Court flexes constitutional muscle

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Today’s decision in the Tribunal Fees case – R(UNISON) v Lord Chancellor [2017] UKSC 51 – is hugely significant on a number of fronts which I expect to be linking to very soon. However, I am not an employment lawyer and would not dare to tread on erudite toes on constitutional issues. But I do […]